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Let’s Test South Africa 2016

Let’s Test South Africa 2016 will be happening again at Kloofzicht Hotel and Spa at the foothills of the Zwartkop Mountains in the Cradle of Humankind from 2 – 4 October 2016.

If you are not already on our mailing list, please subscribe here if you would like more details.

Have a look at our Sponsorship page if you are interested in sponsoring.

Please help us spread the word and look forward to seeing you there!

Regards,
Cindy, Louise, Henke and Johan

Program

Here’s the Let’s Test South Africa 2016 Program!

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Registration

Welcome to the registration page for the Let's Test South Africa 2016 conference!

Let’s Test South Africa will take place at the beautiful Kloofzicht Hotel and Spa.

Included in your conference fee is luxurious accommodation and all meals including tea and coffee and break snacks. Sharing accommodation can be Twin or King bed arrangements. If you would like to share and don't have someone to share with, please indicate this and we will be in touch to assist further.

Early bird prices (if booked and paid by 17 July 2016) –

Early bird sharing – R6 900,00
Early bird single - R9 000,00

From 2 July 2016, prices will be as follows -

Sharing – R8 900,00
Single – R11 000,00

Please note that space is limited.

For groups of 5 or more, please email us to arrange a further discount.

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Keynotes

We are proud to present the following keynotes at Let’s Test South Africa 2016!

Leonidas Hepis & Benjamin Segebartt – Crowd-Sourcing Wisdom: As we Write the Book on Testing

Are you a manual tester or an automated tester? What do such terms really communicate? Are manual testers using their fingers any more than manual CEOs use their fingers? All the test automation sales literature implies that Artificial Intelligence is already in testing: that all we need is to click the button that says “Run” and our products will be bug free.

You cringe at that thought? That might be because you’re neither a manual nor automated tester, but a thinking tester. Thinking is where it’s at. And despite the collection of degrees and certifications and training we may have accumulated, there is still plenty to learn on how to think differently if not better. The human brain’s plasticity is incredible. We can keep learning, it turns out, for as long as we live.

Then there’s the relationship between thinking-writing-speaking. It is impossible to develop any one of these without additionally developing the other two by association. One way then to sharpen our thinking and speaking (and what a great combination of skills to sharpen at a confer-ence!) is to sharpen our writing.

And there is much to learn on writing. That writing fast, for example, is writing better. Or that crowd-sourcing these three skills can lead to a rapid accumulation of wisdom.

Are we ready for the uberization of wisdom? Drop that manicure appointment at this beautiful South African spa – our hands can do manual testing just fine as they are. Rather join us for an exploration of thinking and writing and speaking. Join us as we together write the book on Testing.

Leonidas Hepis has been testing software and managing software test teams since 1994. He helps organizations understand what can be known and what cannot be known through product testing. Better informed about the limits of testing, organizations can improve their processes to produce higher value for their paying customers. He is a certified MBTI practitioner, and a Satir practitioner, helping teams tap into the diverse problem-solving skills offered by the their personality types variety. He believes how we use language affects what kind of problems we can solve, and even how well. He values written discourse as a means to clarify our own thoughts and as a vehicle for a more successful testing industry.

Ben Segebartt is a freelance writer and student, who for over a decade has been working to bridge the gap between people and the software they use. Studying in the field of Cyborg Anthropology at San Diego State University, he evaluates the digital tools we, as a people, develop and adopt. He believes the written word is one of the most powerful tools our species has developed and is excited to have Let’s Test South Africa as the stage for an exploration into just where writing can take us.

Scott Barber – Testing is Testing, Everything else is Context… even Agile

We all know how to test. We’ve been doing it since birth. We test the water before we get in the shower. We test drive cars before we buy. We’ve been taking tests all of our lives too. So if we all have at least some in-born ability to test “stuff”, what’s the big deal about testing software? And beyond that, what makes Agile Testing of Software even a ‘thing’ at all?

Join Scott Barber for this insightful, inspirational, energetic & mumbo-jumbo-simplifying keynote where he will put into perspective what is testing & what is context. Journey with him through the trials and tribulations of his career to date as he oscillated from “Oh testing, whatever” to “testing is hard”, to “I get it now”, to “wait, I thought I understood that” to “no really, I got it this time” and finally to “Why does it seem like everyone is trying to over-complicate this? It’s really simple… Testing is Testing. Everything else is Context”

Scott Barber, Chief Technologist of PerfTestPlus and former Product Owner for SmartBear load testing tools, is widely regarded as a thought-leader in the delivery of performant systems using modern Agile & DevOps principles, but is probably best known as an ‘€œenergetic and entertaining’€ speaker and author of articles and books; Performance Testing Guidance for Web Applications, Beautiful Testing, How to Reduce the Cost of Testing & Web Load Testing for Dummies. His 20+ years of experience filling a wide range of technical, managerial, and executive IT related positions have culminated in a passion for writing, speaking, coaching and activism focused on improving the alignment of development practices with executive business goals. Scott Co-Founded WOPR, served as a Director of AST and CMG, is a member of PMI, ACM, IEEE, American MENSA, ISST, the Context-Driven School of Software Testing, and is a signatory to the Manifesto for Agile Software Development.

Sessions & Workshops

Here you will find descriptions of all the sessions and workshops you can expect to encounter at Let’s Test South Africa 2016. Come join us!

He’s more machine now than man… – Belinda Ndlovu

Software automation has been a buzz word in the software testing space for as long as I can remember. There are different perceptions on what this really is and on who should be doing it. There are some people that believe test automation will result in the ultimate extinction of testers. In an agile software development team writing automated tests is more than just a luxury. It is a need. Test automation helps us to automate test cases and features that are constantly regressing. This way as testers we have more time for actual testing, not just checking. All this is great until you have a large test suite that has to be constantly maintained e.g. try changing one element on a web page that 20 tests rely on. This maintenance hurdle can be frustrating and demotivating altogether. But, what if we could make changes in one place only and have every dependent test use it? In my session we will look at automated tests in Selenium, and how we can use a framework like Page Object model to write maintainable and reusable tests.

Belinda is a tester at DStv Digital media. Her testing background includes functional testing, UI automation with Selenium on both web-based applications, desktop applications and mobile apps, web services automation as well as load and performance testing. She is also obsessive, well within reason; she is not crazy or anything. She just likes a UI/Website/service/application etc. to be as good as possible, and has been known to go through as many iterations as she needs to make that happen. Time permitting, of course. After all the world is full of deadlines and she is yet to miss one.

The Let’s Test Jumpstart – Chris Blain, Vernon Richards & Martin Hynie

Look at all these workshops and sessions! So many interesting concepts and ideas to explore! But… What if the terms and practices aren’t familiar? But… what if your company is not testing this way? What if this is an entirely new adventure for you? Where do you start?

This workshop might be a good place to start.

Sticking with the philosophy and spirit of this conference, this is a highly interactive workshop that aims to gently introduce you to some of the concepts and approaches that may give you a
stronger starting point for the sessions being presented at Let’s Test South Africa. We will go over some testing definitions and concepts you might not be familiar with, try some of the introduced approaches, and go over the conference program to help you get a feel for what each session might offer you. In addition, the facilitators and session leaders will be available throughout the conference for follow-up questions, introductions, and generally good conversations about your learnings from day to day.

Chris has over 18 years of experience in software development. Having worked as a consultant, director of quality engineering, software developer, test architect, and reliability engineer, he has a well-rounded view of what it takes to ship and support high quality software. He is an regular conference speaker who focuses on the evolution of software testing to address an increasingly complex software world.

Follow Chris on Twitter @chris_blain

Vernon has been testing software for 15 years starting with video games on PS2, Xbox & PC. In that time, many changes have occurred in the software development world but testers often still use the trusty old vocabulary of “tests cases”, “pass/fail” & “giving confidence”. Taking advantage of a diverse range of experiences gained on projects such as F1 racing teams, networked gambling machines and others, Vernon helps teams speak in a language the business can understand – no translation necessary!

Follow Vernon on Twitter @TesterFromLeic or visit his blog https://virtesting.com

With over fifteen years of specialization in software testing and development, Martin Hynie’€™s attention has gradually focused on emphasizing value through communication, team development, organizational learning, and the significant role that testers can play to help enable these. A self-confessed conference junkie, Martin travels the world incorporating ideas introduced by various sources of inspiration (including Cynefin, context-driven testing, the Satir Model, Pragmatic Marketing, trading zones, agile principles, and progressive movement training) to help teams iteratively learn, to embrace failures as opportunities and to simply enjoy working together.

Follow Martin on Twitter @vds4 or visit his blog http://developersbestfriend.com

Keep your shirt on! ­ How shallow understanding of values and norms can make collaboration with co­workers harder – ​Oz Chihwayi & ​Maria Kedemo

“WHAT??? THEY INTRODUCED A DRESS CODE???”

The freedom to wear the clothing you want at work is something few people think about until someone violates those norms.

Due to false­consensus bias we like to believe that we share the same values with our co­workers and friends. What we believe is “right” and “wrong” seems clear. But somewhere along the way we begin to learn that our norms and values might be based on shallow agreements. Norms are rules of behaviour or structure, considered “acceptable” by a given group in a given situation. We quickly assign meanings and evaluations when we feel norms are abused but rarely explore them. For example, if a colleague chooses to consistently leave work early, we might interpret it as an abuse of freedom and responsibility. Instead, what if we considered it an excellent opportunity to examine how our norms might be different?

Gaining a shared deeper understanding of what the norms are, and how they are described (or defined) can help influence the team’s culture and how well they can function together. Some wonderful tools for collaboration can
emerge by exploring what the team feels is most important when considering norms and values.

In this highly interactive workshop, we will explore values and norms through a game which we are designing to make it easier to introduce to your team. The game will help you discover what your values are and how your norms might differ from others. The best is, you can immediately take it back to your team.

Takeaways:

­ A model for understanding values and norms in team collaboration.
­ A technique, game to examine and influence your co­workers and team culture for the better.
­ More awareness of what you value.
­ An awareness of other’s perspectives.

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/False­consensus_effect

 

 

Finding Fuzzy Functions front of mind – Danie Roux

When last did you have a conversation where someone just refused to see your point? And you were accused of just not hearing what they have to say?

And you sat down in a heap of despair and felt that there must be something obvious you must be missing?

What you are missing are the fuzzy functions that are front of mind. The functions that do the intake (in Satir terms). In this session we will spend time debugging those fuzzy functions. Especially in moments of stress where the obvious stops being obvious.

We will explore and apply specific tools for putting a “breakpoint” in the fuzzy function so that we can align the intake to the intake of the other.

 

1up your Testing Skills – Jody-Lee Loubser

Video games have been improving our skills for years. It just so happens that a lot of these skills can be applied to testing. Playing more of these games could further improve or enhance our skills, so as to improve our testing.

I will be dissecting my idea of a generic game and highlight the various skills that can be learnt from each of the video game mechanics. Things like leveling up, boss battles and skill selection will be related to testing skills.

I will explore the different video game genres and how each can develop new or enhanced testing skills. Strategy games that teach us planning and patience. They also rely on the gamer to use their collective knowledge of the environment to make the best informed decisions for the current and upcoming situations. In testing, this can also equate to Systems Thinking and knowing a system well enough to be able to spot risks that no one else does.

* Navigating a new area map in a game is a lot like navigating the requirements given to us by Business Analysts. We know what to look for (health packs and “ammo”), so we go straight to those critical areas of the specification.

* “Button bashing” games, such as Street Fighter and Tekken, can often improve our ability to notice and learn new techniques or patterns. This skill can assist with exploratory testing, as we often have no specification and have to learn the system by exploring it. Note, there will be no bashing of keyboards.

* Puzzle games allow for thinking out of the box and assists with analysis skills.

I will reflect on ways to become aware of the skills you can learn from the games that you play, as well as sharing stories and experiences from my colleagues on this topic. Lastly, I will encourage people to learn and build more skills while gaming, whilst still having fun.

Jody-Lee Loubser is a Software Test Analyst in a Test Lead Role. She has 6 years’ of collective experience in Software Testing in the fields of e-commerce, work flow and fleet management, as well as testing various websites. Jody-Lee has spent 3 of the years testing in her home town, Cape Town. She has since moved to Johannesburg to continue her testing career there. Initially Jody-Lee studied Software Development, but has since fallen in love with testing. She has achieved a Foundation and Advanced certification in Software Testing. Jody-Lee enjoys watching Japanese animation, doing sport, learning new things and gaming on various platforms.

Must. Kill. Mutants. – Gerald Mücke

Development is done. All automated tests are written TDD style. Line and Condition coverage is way above 80%. The entire automated test suite resembles a fortress made of bytecode. Everything ready for the release, developers feel confident and relaxed. The product is shipped. But all of a sudden a mutant appears, breaking through the fortress as if it doesn’t exist, finding a way into the product until it materialized as proper Bug bringing the product to fall. Silence. Everyone is petrified in horror. How could this have happened? How could the bug slipped through the defenses? And… How could this have been prevented? The short answer: Mutation Testing.

Mutation Testing has been around for almost 20 years. Originated in academic research it has found its way into the developer’s toolbox being easy to setup, use and producing valuable results. But what is mutation testing? It’s a practice to determine the actual value of an automated test suite and automatically explore parts of the code that have yet been untested, unveiling surprises even to experienced test automation developers. Given a test suite that runs successfully, mutation testing will inject changes to the production code based on a set of rules and reruns the test to determine if the test will fail. Depending on the size of the code base the execution time increases exponentially due to the sheer amount of permutations, requiring thorough planning, focus and prioritization.

In this technical workshop I’d like to give an introduction to the topic in general, what mutations are, how they differ from bugs, what they mean to the product and the development process. Further I’d like to introduce the tooling for Java (Pitest) and would run a hands-on workshop with testers who develop automated tests. During the workshop I’d like to elaborate with the participants and discuss the advantages, downsides, use cases, limitations and pitfalls of mutation testing so that attendees get a feeling when and how this tool fits best in their day-to-day work.

Gerald Mücke is a Java aficionado with more than 10 years of industry experience starting his career as test automation tooling developer for a big software vendor. After working in several roles, industries and projects he founded his own company – DevCon5 – providing software development consulting services to customers. He is especially interested in test and operational topics and apart from practitioning software craftsmenship in general his focal point lies on test automation and mutation testing in particular. He used mutation testing it in various projects since almost two years with growing fascination.

A pattern for testing Change Data Capture – Wai Lee

While working as a tester at large financial institution I had the opportunity to be involved in a large-scale data warehouse implementation.

I had no prior experience in testing data warehouses and as I went along, I developed a pattern for testing data migration from a source database to a target database.

After the project successfully went live, I realised that the pattern I used to test data movements in the warehouse was not data warehouse specific, but Change Data capture specific – the pattern could be applied to various other contexts.

Change Data Capture (CDC) is a set of software design patterns used to determine deltas in data so that action can be taken using the changed data. The goal of CDC is to ensure data synchronicity.
The purpose of this talk is to share the pattern I used to test the data warehouse implementation and to share with you, what I think every tester should know, about Change Data Capture

Wai Lee is an operational and project business analyst with a software testing background. During his testing career Wai was involved in and led various technical testing projects including data warehousing, data analytics and reporting projects. He has 9 years of experience in the IT industry and has worked on projects in the finance, logistics, medical and automotive sectors.

The Life of a Testing Craftsman – Richard Bradshaw

Agile teams are no longer looking for people to fill roles, they are looking to assemble a team of craftsmen. So what does a testing craftsman look like/behave like? Why does a testing craftsman have so much to offer to an already talented agile team?

They say testing is dead, that we don’t need testers in agile, that anyone can test and even if we did need testing, we would automate it. Sure they’re sweeping generalisations, but some appear regularly in talks, podcasts, in blogs and on social media.

They confuse me when I hear them, because I’m a tester, I currently work in an agile context and last time I checked, I wasn’t dead. In actual fact, I’m in high demand, my skill-set warrants high rates, I’m respected and people request for me to be in their teams.

So what do I do all week? Why do companies continue to employ me, spend their money on me.

I’m going to take this opportunity to tell you, it’s not going to be a timeline of; I tested this, then this, I automated this and then I went to a meeting. That would be dull.
No, I’m going to take you through an average week of mine, as the sole tester in an agile context. I’m going to break each activity down, elaborating on what I do, why I do it.

For example:

Why is it I lead product meetings?
Why is it I’ve fixed over 50 bugs in our production code?
Why is it some days I don’t do any testing at all, yet add value?
Why is it I create lots of automation that isn’t automated checks?
Why is it that I write the tickets for our backlog?
How do I report my testing, why do I do it this way?
How do I manage my testing, why manage it this way?
How come I don’t write any test cases?
Why is it that everyone in my team tests, and I’m happy with that?
Why is it that I do a lot of testing before any code is written?
Why is it that developers want to test with me?

Is the story of my week the future of testers in agile, of course not, context.
However I’m not your normal tester, I’m a craftsman, my craft is testing and I’m thriving. So I must be doing something different, something right.

 

Lego Automation – Richard Bradshaw

Automation is playing an ever increasing role within software development, including testing. Specifically to testing we see the desire to have many automated checks in place, in the ‘DevOps’ space we see more and more deployments being automated. The use of CI is becoming common place. But where will it end, what are the limits of all this automation.

In this interactive experiential workshop we will explore automation using Lego Duplo! We will create a number of automated scripts, ever increasing in complexity. We will adapt existing scripts for new purposes. All without writing a single line of code.

Attendees of this workshop will get an insight into the challenges of automating activities. Gain an understanding of the complexity required to automate something that is so simple for a human being to do. Experience how the initial design of your automation impacts all your future decisions. Observe first hand the limitations of automation. Hear real life experiences from myself and other attendees on their experiences with automation.

This fun, high energy workshop will leave you with a core understanding of where to use automation, how to explain it’s purpose with others and more importantly why you decided to automate something.

 

Convert your test report into a Big Visible Chart – Karen Greaves & Samantha Laing

Do you create test reports that provide detailed information about what has been tested, how many tests cases are automated, where the risk areas are for a release, rates of defect discovery and correction, really everything anyone would like to know about the system you test? If only they would READ the report.

One thing we’ve learned from agile is that big visible charts radiate information. People are drawn to them, and conversations start around them. Join us for an interactive workshop where we will help you transform your report into something big and visible that will get people talking about testing and quality.

If you bring your own test report with real data to the workshop you will leave with a new way of representing this information!

Learning Outcomes
• Learn what information radiators are and why they work
• Understand what information people want to know
• Learn techniques for displaying information visually
• Create boards that are quick and easy to update

Karen Greaves (@karen_greaves)
I started my career as a software tester working for Microsoft. I’ve done just about every other job in software since then and I’m now an agile coach and trainer, but testing still has a special place for me. I love helping people understand how awesome testing can be in agile teams.

Samantha Laing (@samlaing)
My personal motto is ‘be brave’, and I embody this by taking on challenges one small step at a time. Most of my career has been in the IT industry, specifically Software Development. Nowadays, I find myself guiding and mentoring others with a passion for agile. This year my focus has been on experimenting and learning from my failures (and successes) – what a great journey so far.

Talking About Testing / STOP TALKING ABOUT TESTING!!! – Martin Hynie & Vernon Richards

Why is it so hard to talk about testing?

It feels like such a struggle every time we try to move the conversation beyond metrics, test coverage, tools and checklists… and yet management still does not get what we are doing and walks away shaking their head. The information created by skilled testing should be of immense value… how can it be so hard to describe our work? This can’t be that hard, can it? Surely it must be them… or… can it possibly be that we are the problem?

In this experiential workshop, Martin and Vernon will guide us through an exploration of models, tools and methods for examining our relationships including:

The SCARF Model
Cynefin and Sense-Making
Trading Zones and Interactional Expertise
Context Driven… as it relates to communication

We will look at how we communicate with leaders and decision makers outside the world of testing. Using real world frustrations (that you bring to the workshop), we will discover how the very skills that make you an excellent tester can be leveraged to building linguistic bridges between groups who do not speak the same language.

The talent and value that you bring to your company should be something that you find very easy to sell to anyone who is passionate about achieving the corporate goals. In this workshop, we will discover how to change the conversation away from explaining why testing matters and towards how we are part of building opportunity for success.

Vernon has been testing software for 15 years starting with video games on PS2, Xbox & PC. In that time, many changes have occurred in the software development world but testers often still use the trusty old vocabulary of “tests cases”, “pass/fail” & “giving confidence”. Taking advantage of a diverse range of experiences gained on projects such as F1 racing teams, networked gambling machines and others, Vernon helps teams speak in a language the business can understand – no translation necessary!

With over fifteen years of specialization in software testing and development, Martin Hynie’s attention has gradually focused on emphasizing value through communication, team development, organizational learning, and the significant role that testers can play to help enable these. A self-confessed conference junkie, Martin travels the world incorporating ideas introduced by various sources of inspiration (including Cynefin, context-driven testing, the Satir Model, Pragmatic Marketing, trading zones, agile principles, and progressive movement training) to help teams iteratively learn, to embrace failures as opportunities and to simply enjoy working together.

Escape The Curse Of The Temple – Scaling Collaboration – Regina Martins

I recently attended the Retrospective Facilitators Gathering in Portugal where I met up with a bunch of awesome people who love incorporating board games into their coaching. I, for one, love playing to learn something, and most adults are just big kids who love to play at the drop of a hat.

In fact, it is through the experiential nature of play that adults learn abstract concepts or things that previously was difficult to achieve, but in the game space they were able to get some significant ah-ha moments.

This workshop revolves around teaching participants about team collaboration and how to scale that to external stakeholders using an adventure board game as the centre piece. Teams will be formed and each will have their own board game. There are curses and gems, and the ultimate treasure is the team learning to collaborate to escape the curse of the temple.

There’s adventure and music – the purpose is to show people that either the whole team wins or the whole team loses – there is no winner takes all.

Take aways
Structured methods of collaboration for teams
Scaling collaboration to include external stakeholders
The collaborative nature of decision making in teams
Learning through play and having fun in the process

work as an Agile Coach and love what I do. I’ve worked in IT for most of my working career although I started off in the business. I’ve worked mainly in the financial services industry although I did spent 8 years managing projects at Dimension Data, a telco service provider.

I discovered Scrum in 2010 and have never looked back from that. I get energised when I am involved in building self-organised teams and facilitating these teams to deliver value to business stakeholders.

Before I fell in love with Agile I had been a Project Manager delivering projects rather successfully using waterfall methods for 10 years. I resisted Scrum for 3 months and when the magic started happening, despite my confused feelings about letting go and not trying to control everything all of the time, I became an instant convert.

I aim for continuous improvement in my personal and professional lives. I’m now comfortable not having all the answers, nor all the questions. Retrospectives are my favourite of the Scrum sessions and the one which I consider the most important.

For fun I engage in public speaking, reading, photography and travel.

Getting Performance on the Map: Practical, Implementable, Low/No Cost ways *every* tester can drive performance gains – Scott Barber

Join Scott Barber for this workshop to learn about performance testing for the bottom up. That is, how can we get performance testing off the ground without buying the Big Expensive Tools and learn why we would ever even need those tools in the process.

Scott Barber, Chief Technologist of PerfTestPlus and former Product Owner for SmartBear load testing tools, is widely regarded as a thought-leader in the delivery of performant systems using modern Agile & DevOps principles, but is probably best known as an “energetic and entertaining” speaker and author of articles and books; Performance Testing Guidance for Web Applications, Beautiful Testing, How to Reduce the Cost of Testing & Web Load Testing for Dummies). His 20+ years of experience filling a wide range of technical, managerial, and executive IT related positions have culminated in a passion for writing, speaking, coaching and activism focused on improving the alignment of development practices with executive business goals. Scott Co-Founded WOPR, served as a Director of AST and CMG, is a member of PMI, ACM, IEEE, American MENSA, ISST, the Context-Driven School of Software Testing, and is a signatory to the Manifesto for Agile Software Development.

Our sponsors

We’d like to say thank you to our sponsors who are helping make Let’s Test South Africa possible. To find out how you can become a sponsor, visit our sponsoring page or contact us directly at info(at)lets-test.com

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Let's Test Conferences on Context-Driven Testing - For Testers, By Testers

When we say ”for testers, by testers” we mean that our main goal for these conferences is to make them a valuable experience for all participants, not to maximize profit. We are ourselves part of a team made up of serious, passionate and professional testers that back in 2011 decided that it was time to set up a context-driven testing conference in Europe. Since the inaugural Let’s Test conference in 2012, some team members have left and others have been added, and the conference has expanded to been organized in Australia as well as in Europe. We’re happy to see the Let’s Test family grow, but regardless of where you visit a Let’s Test conference, you can be sure that we’ll never compromise on the “for testers, by testers” principle.