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Let’s Test 2018 South Africa

Let’s Test 2018 South Africa will take place at the beautiful Valley Lodge & Spa in Magaliesburg, South Africa. Close to major attractions in the historic region of the magical and mystical Cradle of Humankind World Heritage site just outside Johannesburg and Pretoria.

The conference runs for 2.5 days between 25 – 27 November 2018 and will have an intentional focus on the craft and community of Context Driven Testing. We will showcase not only South African talent, but also host new and familiar faces and minds from the global community.

If you are not already on our mailing list, please subscribe here to make sure you don’t miss any announcements!

And please have a look at our Sponsorship page if you are interested in becoming one of our valued sponsors!

Regards,
Cindy, Louise and Matthew

Need help convincing your boss?

We sometimes hear from people that they would like nothing more than to attend Let’s Test, but for some reason or another, they are having a hard time convincing their boss to open their wallet. Here are some things we suggest you try telling them to justify the “expense” (investment!).

Justification E-Mail: Attending LetsTest SA (tailor to fit your situation)

To: <Insert Manager or Supervisor Name>

Subject: Attending LetsTest SA

I’d like to get your approval to attend Let’s Test Conference, 25 – 27 November 2018 at the Valley Lodge & Spa in Magaliesburg, South Africa, just outside Johannesburg and Pretoria.

There’s no other conference in South Africa arranged by testers for testers where I’ll have the opportunity to learn about context driven testing from local and international members of the community. I’ll have access to practitioners of the software testing craft from around the world—this is an ideal opportunity to develop a network of like-minded testers in the software industry.

These testers are committed to enhancing the value of testing in challenging project environments focused on enhancing technology deliveries to business.

I’ll be able to choose from a large number of sessions mostly aimed at testing, but including some practical workshops on writing maintainable, reusable automated tests, understanding values and norms and the impact they can have on the team, and how gaming can be used to gain valuable skills relevant to software testing! And many more. All sessions are facilitated allowing great interaction and ensuring threads of topics are not lost and questions flow adding meaning to the word confer. There will be a TestLab where I can collaborate and try out my learnings from the day. For example, I plan to focus on:

● <<Session names and how they apply to current Projects>>

Here’s what past attendees said about their experience:

  • “I had a wonderful time, met loads of great people and learned a lot. So I think I can truly say : it was an awesome Conference”
  • “LetsTest raises the bar for conferences”
  • “LetsTest is rocking!! Literally”
  • “Good collaborative experiments at the LetsTest TestLab last night”
  • “LetsTest is one of those places where suddenly someone points out an obvious solution which has evaded you until now”
  • “A big thank you to all at LetsTest for making it an extremely rich experience and to all the people taking the time to share and discuss ideas”

This is the approximate cost of my attending LetsTest:
Airfare or transport applicable: R
Hotel, meals and registration all included for : R
Other expenses: R
Total cost: R

Attending LetsTest SA will have huge value for me and <company, department, or organization name>. Please let me know if you have any questions, and thanks in advance for your support.

<name>

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Our sponsors

To find out how you can become a sponsor, visit our sponsoring page or contact us directly at info(at)lets-test.com

We’d like to say thank you to our 2018 sponsors who are helping make Let’s Test South Africa possible.

Click on the sponsor logos to find out more!

 

 

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Sunday (Day 1)

Let’s Test 2018 – Sunday (Day 1) Talks & Speakers


When You Say Context, Does That Include Me?

Ash Coleman

Abstract

The notion of Context Driven Testing has spawned conversations about how much context is valuable… but in our roles as software testers, our focus understandably tends to be mostly about context in testing. We very rarely extend our thinking about context beyond our test strategy. Have we ever sat back and thought, how much of this context is about me?

A crazy thought; perhaps the context that defines me calculates into the overall outlook as is described by the desired outcome of the product?

In this workshop, we will explore the context of our personal perspective and experience as it pertains to the overall quality of the product. Our personal attributes as a tool and mechanism to change the measure and influence of quality for a more diverse, scalable, and sustainable output.

Bio

Ash, a former chef, put recipes aside when she began her career in software development, falling back on her skills in engineering she acquired as a kid building computers with her brother. A progressive type, Ash has focused her efforts within technology on bringing awareness to inclusion of women and people of color, especially in the Context Driven Testing and Agile communities. An avid fan of matching business needs with technological solutions, you can find her doing her best work on whichever coast is the sunniest. Having helped teams build out testing practices, formulate Agile processes and redefine culture, she now works as an Engineering Manager in Quality for Credit Karma and continues consulting based out of San Francisco.


Now, What’s Your Plan?

Henrik Andersson & Leo Hepis

Talk Abstract

The future is here. Our top-notch robots — robots you can see with your eyes and touch with your hands — are ready to solve problems.

Or are they? (Maybe we should learn a bit more about context first!!!)

In this interactive and challenging session, we will form small teams and create/prioritize product backlogs, and will do so with a twist: the context (the various circumstances that form the setting around our projects) will evolve through the session, thus putting pressure on us to adapt our planning and prioritization.

Together we will discover how far context reaches: the robot’s differing purposes, operating environment, users and their environments, the team’s differing environments, the company’s differing financial and legal environments, the industry’s differing circumstances, and so forth.

Without context exploration and clarity, we are subject to misinterpreting work statements. When instead we achieve convergent interpretation of context, we achieve convergent interpretation of the work statements and the reasoning behind them. With that shared understanding, we reduce risk and uncertainty when prioritizing, make better sense of backlog, and in turn produce a more successful product.

As the session progresses, new information will cast different light on the robot projects, forcing us into tough decisions about context-changes. The users may not be who we thought they were; or the terrain might be different. How will your backlog and priorities evolve as a result? What differences will we see between the different teams’ backlogs?

We will end with a brainstorm on context variables to consider when planning. This will provide you with a list of context variables you might consider in generating ideas to aid backlog prioritization. If you start using the list in your work, over time you will most likely come up with even more variables to add to the list to make it all yours in your context.

Come explore context and the robots!

For the record the robots in this session are toy robots that we imagine to be used in serious real time contexts.

Workshop Takeaways:

Learn and experience how context variance results in different stories even for identical functionality By understanding what context really is, you will better identify your context at work and incorporate context aspects when describing your product You will walk away with a list of factors that affect context. When back at work, with each project you can grow the list, which in turn will help you identify context even better in future projects. Uncovering and adapting to context will make you deliver a greater value to your stakeholders

Bios

Henrik co-founded House of Test to enable testers to live out their passion for testing and become the best-skilled testers ever. I believe that we grow and become better by sharing knowledge and learn from others. I do this through the context driven testing community where I am a well known and respected face and voice. He is the co-founder of the world renowned Let’s Test conference with the purpose to provide a home and learning ground for our community.

Leo’s bio coming soon.


Samplings, Studies and Demonstrations

Carsten Feilberg

Abstract

For some reason the actual craft of testing is hard to describe for most. I understand that non-testers may struggle, but within the testing communities there are also multiple descriptions and definitions. For some reason ‘testing’ became an overloaded term and so it can mean literally whatever you’d like it to. So what is it we do when we say ‘we are testing’?

I have spent years on trying to grasp this myself, and finally I believe I have the upper hand on it.

I will present the concept here: samplings, studies and demonstrations. These are the things we do, and which on their own often earn the rubber stamp: ‘testing’.

To give you a quick warm-up:

The way I define sampling is as the activity of collecting data through interaction with software, and using this data to support, discard or question the models that guide us in that moment. Sounds fishy? Another way to put it is: Sampling is basically what we do when we will just try something out…

Demonstrations is what we do when we showcase something. When do we do that? Acceptance testing is a good example: we follow scripts and voilá – now you see how wonderful the product is (or is not). There is nothing wrong in doing this. Only if demonstrations are being used with false expectations, such as thinking that we will find a lot of bugs on our way. That is not what you do when you are showcasing anything, is it?

Finally studies – when we need to dig deeper and build more robust models that helps us understand better – and brings meaning to our samplings and demonstrations. This is where we get really scientific – and also quite unpredictable to the horror of the people we work for.

And the final trick: knowing when you do what and why – so you can explain better what it is you need to do.

So – that’s what I want to talk about.

Bio

I’ve been creating software since the early 1980’ies and testing it for around 20 years. I have a MSc in Computer Technology and  I’ve had pretty much any role you can think of in a project. I use my testing skills to help build software. I want things to work, and work properly. Since 2009 when I discovered that I’d spent most of my career studying technology I found that people are the critical part of any software system during the entirety of its life cycle, So I started to study people and their interaction. Much harder, much more challenging. Meanwhile I have talked and presented at numerous conferences around the world. And although I’ve come to regard software as a special specie – an organism that needs feeding and proper care – I’m not quite as crazy as I would like to be, but I do have a very dark sense of humour. I would definitely love to talk to you about software and testing. So just say hello – I’m tall, so you can easily find me.


Learning to Dance:
Hit The Ground Running at Every Work Session

Alison Gitelson & Regina Martins

Abstract

Would you like to learn some fun ways to help people quickly transition into the work session or meeting? To be present, open, clear thinking, ready to work together, egos at the door? And would you like to learn that whilst having fun learning to samba? (two left feet very welcome ;-))

Workshop takeaways:

  •      Experience bridging the gap between learning something new, and doing it with skill and confidence
  •      Have the confidence to use any one of three applied improv games to transition groups into a work session
  •      Learn to Samba in the process

Bios

Alison Gitelson of CanBeeDone is a maximizer, facilitator and growth enabler.

She combines over thirty years of technical and management experience (in healthcare, ICT, engineering, education, government and NGO sectors) with a deep understanding of human behaviour.

Hating to see time and effort wasted she helps leader-managers to bring out the best in themselves and the people they work with, so the people and the business can thrive.

Alison has successfully led teams through transformation and change, and mentored other leader managers to do the same.

Her workshops consistently receive high ratings and are received as informative, engaging, practical and transformative by clients from a broad spectrum of businesses. She is a popular presenter at Agile and Lean conferences and events.

Regina Martins of agile42 is an experienced Agile Coach, a developer of high-performing teams and facilitator of big group interventions. She gets energised when involved in building self-organising teams and facilitating these teams to deliver value.

Regina has work and consulting experience at four of the major banks in South Africa and leverages off Gregory Bateson’s work on the logical levels of learning and change when working with team maturation, and Dr. Glenda Eoyang’s Human Systems Dynamics on coaching leaders in managing in uncertainty and complexity.

She’s a regular speaker at local and international Agile conferences and has been involved in the organisation and coaching of novice speakers at the annual Agile Africa conference.


 

Monday (Day 2)

Let’s Test 2018 – Monday (Day 2) Talks & Speakers


Keynote: Doubt Builds Trust
Elizabeth Zagroba

Abstract

Testing is not quality assurance. I trust the tester who expresses doubt. Doubt builds trust.

“I don’t know” sparks a dialogue. I’ll explore how safety language, specificity, and nuance shape the way we work. Testing software means engaging with uncertainty; our communication should reflect that.

Talk description

In an uncertain world, your team wants answers. Project managers want to know when you can ship. Project owners want testing to be done. Developers want to know that you’ve caught all the bugs. Testers can find jobs getting paid to assure people of a product’s quality. But I don’t trust testers who always have confident answers to their team’s questions. Eventually a bug gets through, a deadline is missed, or a commitment is broken. Testing is not quality assurance. I trust the tester who expresses doubt. Doubt builds trust.

In my talk, I’ll explore how safety language, specificity, and nuance should color everything about the way we work. Testing software means engaging with uncertainty, and our communication should reflect that. Saying “I don’t know” can spark the beginning of a dialogue. Being able to admit the possibility of an unexplored path, a unknown interaction, or a fallible memory makes the difference between a team that moves forward and a team that stagnates by digging up evidence of mistaken certainty. We’ll get thinking about why it’s most important to say “I don’t know” in an interview and how admitting doubt can help a tester find an environment where they can thrive.

I want to give testers the power to be vulnerable at work. Rather than staying silent, testers can start admitting what they don’t know to get better explanations for themselves. If they’re already a pro at this themselves, they can encourage their teammates to voice their questions and foster an environment where this is encouraged.

Bio

Elizabeth tests software at Mendix in Rotterdam. She’s tested web apps, mobile apps, APIs, and content management systems.

Elizabeth ironically spent most of 2017 evangelizing about the power of introverts to crowds at conferences in Europe and the United States. The same year, her article about mind maps became one of the most viewed on Ministry of Testing Dojo. Her background as a musician and a mathematician gives her the persistence to practice her skills while staying open to the possibility of better solutions.


Test-Driven ClojureScript

Daniel Irvine

Talk Abstract

Get hands-on practice at learning ClojureScript (a LISP!), using functional TDD. What’s amazing is that these functional programming skills can be applied to almost any programming language. You’ll gain new thinking about what counts as high-quality code, and no doubt a desire to write more Clojure!

Talk Description

The purpose of the talk is to instil some of the magic of LISP into the attendees. ClojureScript is very approachable and it’s quick to get started, so you should find yourself producing working software by the end of the session.

Normally when people teach ClojureScript, the focus is on REPL driven development and live reloading of webpages. But I’ll show a different approach: strict TDD using merciless refactoring. The advantage of this approach is that you can really stop to think about the question “what makes good code?” Rather than refreshing the webpage every minute to verify results, we let the automated tests tell us if it’s fine and only do a manual test at the very end.

All levels are welcome and encouraged to attend—those with previous experience with Clojure and ClojureScript are encouraged to bring their own talking points to share with the group.

Bio

I am a software consultant based in London, UK. I’m a member of the software craft community, and a founder and organizer of Queer Code London. As well as writing software, I enjoy mentoring others and promoting diversity & inclusion within the tech industry. I’m an occasional blogger and public speaker.

My preferred programming style is based on strict Test-Driven Development (TDD), pair-programming and the XP methodology, although I have worked with many other methodologies (yes, waterfall too!). I have developed software for a range of platforms, including the web (full-stack), Windows desktop, cloud, distributed systems and mobile. I’m particularly fond of Clojure and ClojureScript but I’ve also worked with C++, C#, Java, JavaScript, and Ruby.


Unstick your Sticky Issues

Olga Yiannakis & Regina Martins

Abstract

For testers who need skilful ways of dealing with sticky issues be it from stakeholders or within the team, this interactive adaptive action lab is a way to explore difficult issues by asking “what is my next wise move?” that will help them influence the system in ways that they can touch.

Talk description

All testers in all sizes of organisations daily deal with complex situations. Adaptive Action is probably the most skilful way to deal with complexity. Leveraging off the work done by Dr Glenda Eoyang from the Human Systems Dynamics Institute, this mini adaptive action workshop will provide attendees with practical experience to gain a better understanding of how to frame and deal with their complex sticky issues going forward.

Opening: Pairs will share complex sticky issues they are dealing with in their relevant spaces:
We will start off by opening the workshop by asking attendees to think about a problem that they are currently dealing with, and to share it with another person, who will ask questions about the issue. After both have shared their issues, they then discuss with each other what the commonalities are that both issues share.

Theory – How we can use similarities and differences to get deeper understanding and how can we decide on our next wise move through Adaptive Action?
After connecting attendees with their sticky issues, we now share some theory, and will discuss: – What are Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS)? – We will introduce a tool to help attendees better understand their sticky issue, so that it informs their next action, and talk about how we can use similarities and differences as a mechanism for deeper understanding. – We also discuss how deeply understanding their sticky issue using the tool will help them decide on their next wise move. – This theory share is wrapped in the 3 questions of Adaptive Action: What? So What? Now What?

Adaptive action exercise:
Groups will now use their newly acquired skills & techniques to practically explore their complex sticky issues, & decide on the next wisest action they can undertake. This will help them move from the problem space into the pattern space into the action space. They will be able to take their newly found skills out of this action lab & into their daily lives. This is the bulk of the workshop (80% of the workshop).

Close:
To close off the workshop, we ask attendees to shout out their 1 key takeaway from the workshop. People will leave with tools & techniques that will help with the complex issues that they are faced with, in work or life, and will help them influence in ways that they can touch with a new lens through which to look at their sticky issues.

Bios

Olga has been working with software development teams on all project types & sizes for the past 17 years. She certified as a Scrum Master when she attended my first Scrum Gathering in 2010 & has been on her agile journey ever since. She is currently an Agile Coach at a FinTech company. She is very passionate about anything to do with Agile (e.g. Scrum, Kanban & Lean) & working with people to create high performing teams. She is also active in the agile community & loves how people can share their experiences & knowledge to help each other learn & grow. https://www.linkedin.com/in/olgayiannakis/

In her role as Programme Manager responsible for IT delivery for a bank in Mauritius Regina led a software development team to successfully deliver strategic change to the business using Scrum. She has been a Scrum Master and Agile Coach since 2010. She gets energised when she is involved in building self-organising teams and facilitating these teams to deliver value to business stakeholders. She is experienced in navigating governance and processes to make Agile work in a corporate environment. She enjoys organising and speaking at conferences, locally and internationally. Regina is a Certified Scrum Professional®, Certified LeSS Practitioner®, a Kanban Management Professional® and a TBR Practitioner. https://www.linkedin.com/in/reginatmartins/


How to Interview Like a Tester

Elizabeth Zagroba & Martin Hynie

Abstract

Stop antagonizing your interview candidates. Learn how to get the best out of people by sitting on the same side of the table in a work-like environment.

Talk Description

For many people, interviews are a series of questions with one clear answer. The entire process can feel disingenuous or misleading on either side. The candidate is saying what the interviewer wants to hear, but the candidate doesn’t get a good idea of the day-to-day. The interviewer’s touting the company line, but they can’t tell how much the candidate contributed to their projects. How can we change our approach to interviewing to get good information on both sides?

One of the many skills that software testers bring to an organization is the ability to emulate how our software might behave in production by applying tools, techniques and collaborative approaches. Testers create scenarios and environments that help our team envision user behaviour and experience. What if we apply some of these approaches when interviewing a new member of the testing team?

In this experiential workshop, we’re going to demonstrate some approaches that help foster an interview environment where everyone can be their genuine, authentic selves. In so doing, participants with practice how to:

– Ask open-ended questions to uncover how candidates form their train of thought
– Encourage the sharing of narratives without giving too much away
– Continuously re-evaluate hopes and expectations as new information is uncovered
– Collaborate with the candidate to discover opportunities rather than search for the “right” answer
– Think like a tester exploring a potential new member of the system you live in.

Bios

Elizabeth tests software at Mendix in Rotterdam. She’s tested web apps, mobile apps, APIs, and content management systems.

Elizabeth ironically spent most of 2017 evangelizing about the power of introverts to crowds at conferences in Europe and the United States. The same year, her article about mind maps became one of the most viewed on Ministry of Testing Dojo. Her background as a musician and a mathematician gives her the persistence to practice her skills while staying open to the possibility of better solutions.

With almost twenty years of specialization in software testing and development, Martin’s attention has gradually shifted towards embracing uncertainty, and redefining testing as an ongoing transformative research activity. The greatest gains in quality can be found when we emphasize communication, team development, business alignment and organizational learning.
A self-confessed conference junkie, Martin travels the world incorporating ideas introduced by various sources of inspiration (including Cynefin, complexity theory, constraint theory, ontologies, the Satir Model, branding and marketing science, agile principles, and even progressive natural movement training… no, not kidding) to help teams iteratively learn, to embrace failures as opportunities and to simply enjoy working together.


A Tester’s Guide to the Illusions of Unit Testing

Ash Winter

Abstract

You know what testers are obsessed with? The testing that testers do. It’s only part of the wider testing world. Testers can add much more value by busting their own and others illusions about unit testing, getting closer to their teams and making integration and acceptance tests much more effective

Description

One area that testers might be able to enhance their contributions to software development teams is how we perceive and contribute to unit testing. Being able to influence this type of testing in a positive manner is a skill that testers will need to get to grips with, as more companies start to embrace a model of lone testers in cross functional teams. The shift of focus from primarily the testing that testers do, to the testing that the team does, is a key shift in thinking and behaviour.

To facilitate this shift, I believe testers busting their own illusions about this aspect of building something good would bring us much closer to developers, and help us realise what other layers of testing can cover most effectively. The last point is pertinent here, as knowing and guiding unit testing brings the role of integration, acceptance and exploratory testing into sharp focus.

This is a topic that has always intrigued me, having predominantly worked as a single tester on a team for the last five or so years. I reached out to the community with the question “What do testers believe about unit testing?” and received a lot of engagement. The good users of Twitter added another 50 or so illusions that testers might have about this layer of testing. I figured that based on that level of engagement, maybe this would make an interesting talk! It wasn’t only testers who responded too, suggesting that there might be some shared illusions about unit testing that are cross disciplinary.

The growing list delighted me, so I wrote a blog with the raw list, it can be found here http://testingisbelieving.blogspot.co.uk/2017/12/testers-guide-to-myths-of-unit-testing.html

The list alone is interesting but now I would like to share my analysis of it with you, focusing on:

Recurring themes within the list and how to address them as a tester or developer.
Particular illusions to look out for with examples from my recent past.
A guide for developers to engage with testers on unit testing, and testers with developers.

Bio

I’m a consulting tester and conference speaker with an eye for an untested assumption or claim. Veteran of various roles encompassing testing, performance engineering and automation. As a team member delivering mobile apps and web services or a leader of teams and change. I help teams think about testing problems, asking questions and coaching when invited. I have talked and workshopped internationally, performing at various TestBashes, Copenhagen Context, TestNet and many more.

Also, I’m a co-organiser for the Leeds Testing Atelier, a free, full day testing workshop. Its mission is to give those involved in testing a platform to share their stories. It attracts over 100 attendees from various disciplines. We have done 6 of these and I absolutely love it, the testing community has provided a lot of opportunity for me, so I’m paying it forward. We give new speakers a shot, host experimental workshops on topics such as mental health, host the event in a LGBTQ+ safe space and have a great time organising!


The Art of Remote Work

Jay-Allen Morris & Kirsten Clacey

Abstract

Remote working is becoming increasingly popular. We feel it is important to develop practical skills to enable more effective remote collaboration regardless of one’s role. We’ve developed an interactive session around the facilitation of collaborative remote team sessions with the simplest tools.

Description

OBJECTIVES -Awareness: What to think about when facilitating remote sessions -Understanding: Facilitation principles and how they map to remote contexts -Practice: How to plan and run remote sessions (how can participants apply this within their testing roles)

WORKSHOP FORMAT
1. Warm Up {10 mins} As people are walking into the room, they will be given the instruction to answer some questions to start engaging in the topic

2. Introduction/Opening {15 mins} Discuss purpose and outcomes for the session Explain who we are Walk through agenda and share URL for slides (Using URL shortener). Do a remote check in as a way to show how we will be engaging with the format of the session

3. Facilitation principles to consider {20 mins} We will create the space to explain each principle with a practical demonstration relevant to each: flow, creating a collaborative space, same experience for all, low barrier to entry, don’t let your tool become your prison, time boxing and creating psychological safety

4. Practice {10 mins} Groups will get a chance to make their own virtual format for a chosen remote session.

5. Group Debrief {10 mins} Each group will debrief the exercise by discussing some prepared questions together.

6. Scrum Examples {15 mins} To cement the learning from the above, we will walk through 4 very basic formats as ideas for each of the scrum ceremonies.

7. Close {5 mins} Recap topics discussed and themes learned

8. Questions {5mins}

Bios

Jay
I currently work at Jumo as an Agile Lead and as a volunteer committee member for Scrum User Group South Africa (SUGSA). I think the most amazing thing about me is that I became a scrum master by “accident” but now I can’t imagine doing anything else. I really love finding new ways to encourage collaboration and transparency and connecting with other communities. My favourite things are building lego and playing games.

Kirsten
Kirsten began her career in counselling and psychology and moved into software about 4 years ago. In the last 3-4 years she has found facilitating and coaching Agile teams deeply rewarding as the role allows her to bring a lot of the things she cares deeply about together. She is currently working at Jumo as a Scrum Master and Facilitator. Prior to this she worked at 22seven as an Agile Facilitator.


Are We On The Same Page?

Henke Andersson & Leo Hepis

Abstract

Want to play a central role in providing direction for your team, on what to develop, for whom, why, and by when? You see what others do not yet see, from the unique vantage point testers acquire when the rubber hits the road. Want to make that a leadership asset?

Description

Want to play a central role in providing direction for your team, on what to develop, for whom, why, and by when? Want to lead your team in reducing unknowns? You often see what others do not yet see, from the unique vantage point testers acquire when the rubber hits the road. Want to make that a leadership asset?

Then this is the right workshop for you. We believe testers should take a lead seat in planning sessions, backlog grooming, estimation, or coffee-maker think tanks. Because testers typically master product-wide expertise, testers are uniquely positioned to drive the team to seek clarity of what is known and what is worth discovering.

Our mission is to enable you to take the seat at the steering wheel. We want you to become an even more valuable asset for the team, testing before a single line of code is written.

We will provide activities to help get the words out that are helpful. We will practice what questions you may ask to extract as much information as possible, how you know what information you are looking for, and how you may visualize what you know. Most importantly, we will discuss how you ensure that all in the team have the same understanding of what to develop. In other words, how to all be on the same page.

When you get better at these tasks it will be much easier to plan and test. To put it simply, you will be more successful.

Workshop Takeaways:

The tester’s mindset can be a powerful compass for team planning meetings How to target conversations so that they illuminate the direction of the project Obtaining clarity (knowns, unknowns) helps everyone on the team Using feedback to ensure everyone’s on the same page

Bios

Henrik co-founded House of Test to enable testers to live out their passion for testing and become the best-skilled testers ever. I believe that we grow and become better by sharing knowledge and learn from others. I do this through the context driven testing community where I am a well known and respected face and voice. He is the co-founder of the world renowned Let’s Test conference with the purpose to provide a home and learning ground for our community.

Leo’s bio coming soon.


Getting the Best from My Time Here

Alison Gitelson

Abstract

We learn by comparing new knowledge to old, making sense of it & moving it into stored memory. Without the space & time to do this we forget most of the new. This comfortable session will make sure you do remember all the great things you have learnt, deepen your thinking & can use them at work.

By the end of the session you will have:
•             Reflected on your experiences of the conference so far
•             More deeply explored your thinking or understanding of at least one session that you attended
•             Prepared yourself to use one (or more) new thought/tool/learning in your own work

Bio

Alison Gitelson of CanBeeDone is a maximizer, facilitator and growth enabler.

She combines over thirty years of technical and management experience (in healthcare, ICT, engineering, education, government and NGO sectors) with a deep understanding of human behaviour.

Hating to see time and effort wasted she helps leader-managers to bring out the best in themselves and the people they work with, so the people and the business can thrive.

Alison has successfully led teams through transformation and change, and mentored other leader managers to do the same.

Her workshops consistently receive high ratings and are received as informative, engaging, practical and transformative by clients from a broad spectrum of businesses. She is a popular presenter at Agile and Lean conferences and events.


Will VR Bring a New Focus?

Michael Albrecht & Johan Bergström

Abstract

All human senses is affected by VR, so it is really hard to test the VR experience with automated tests or AI. A computer will never experience nausea or dizziness. We will together in smaller groups plan and execute a team test session of a VR headset and create an understandable test report.

Description

Almost all our human senses is affected by VR, so it is really hard to test the VR experience with automated tests or AI. A computer will never experience nausea or dizziness as a human being will.

How do you effectively test VR from a human perspective?
Have you ever felt the need to do a quick quality assurance of a product or website aside from your regular day by day testing efforts?
Have your team been given an assignment to test a completely new product from scratch within a tight time frame?
Perhaps you want to have a different set of eyes looking at your product?
Do you want other persons in your project to get more involved in your testing?

This workshop session will give you the tools and insight on how you can organize a team, add control to the testing, execute a team test session and create an understandable report to show your results. We will together in smaller groups plan and execute a team test session of a VR headset and create an understandable test report. With combining well known and frequently used techniques in a modern way of testing the latest and most exciting new technology. Work together as team and learn from each other strengths.

Bios

Michael Albrecht
By successfully implementing agile and exploratory testing in customer projects covering as diverse areas as online gaming and stock exchange programs and as a co-creator of xBTM, Michael has a very good track-record of inspiring testers to take their testing to new levels and to find unexpected bugs in unexpected ways.

Michael is also one of the enthusiasts behind Swedish Exploratory Testers (SWET) and Stockholm Exploratory Testing (SET), peer conferences for exploratory testing geeks in Sweden.

By working together with KYH, a Swedish college with a program for the next generation testers, Michael is spreading his knowledge about new and efficient test methods to a larger audience.

Johan Bergström
Johan have a solid background as a test lead and requirements analyst from the Financial Industry, working for and with several Banks and Stock exchanges all over the world and successfully bringing modern test techniques to an otherwise conservative and traditional industry. Johan has shared is experience with and inspired other testers as a teacher in the xBTM.

Johan is also one of the enthusiasts behind Stockholm Exploratory Testing (SET), peer conferences for exploratory testing geeks in Sweden.


 

Tuesday (Day 3)

Let’s Test 2018 – Tuesday (Day 3) Talks & Speakers


How to Make Everyone Hate You and Ensure Testing Fails at Your Company While Maintaining Job Security

Rob Herbst

Abstract

A highlights reel of questionable testing decisions (I made) and their consequences along with a few tips and success stories

Talk description

Somewhere along the way teams often shift their focus away from delivering working software to users and towards meeting coverage metrics, eliminating manual work and above all getting that green tick next to the latest build. I’d like to share some stories of how decisions that seemed smart at the time could be—with hindsight—interpreted as sabotage.

In this talk our anti-hero will illustrate how forgetting why testing software is valuable can lead to failure and tears but how sometimes following the intent and not the rule leads to better quality, better assurances and happier teams.

Episodes include “The one where the build took so long we just left it”, “Only John knows how those work” and “You’re going to learn to code a and you’re going to like it” with guest appearances from the “It’s not our fault, Rachel tested it and said it works!” crew.

Bio

Robert is a lover of all things code related and passionate about sharing “Aha!” moments he experiences.

He’s walked a winding path through the software world but has most recently been involved with frontend applications and has some insights and learnings to share that come from working on large applications with various sorts of teams.

He enjoys talking at meetups and conferences and helping people level up in whichever way he can.


Mental Health as a Tester

David Williams

Talk Abstract

Having gone from the highest of high points in my career, plummeting down to wanting to never work in tech again I’m hopeful that this real life and raw story will encourage others to look after their mental wellbeing, and to seek help when needed in order to be the best version of themselves.

Talk Description

In early 2003 I started my career as a gifted, but cocky young tester with steady career progression and a love of learning. I was confident with the skills I had developed but my “I know all the things!” attitude quickly disappeared as I started to realise how broad a tester’s skill set could be, and how much I could still improve. I attended the “Rapid Software Testing” course, taught by James Bach, and read all the books and blogs I could find, improving my testing skills further still. The sky was the limit. Then, 6 years later in early 2009 everything stalled and went into year after year of flatline, culminating in my career, family, passion and confidence as a tester being decimated. Coming to a crashing halt 5 years later, I went deep into depression and was affected by a stress-related autoimmune issue, requiring a physical operation to correct. From that point I simply couldn’t see a way to get back into the driving seat, and decided I would quit my career for good. I resigned from my role with no job to go to, and no plans to continue my testing career, or in fact any type of technology role. I was burned-out. This story is about the stages of my testing career, issues I encountered in those stages, and how others can learn from the mistakes I’ve made, so that they can avoid having to go through them in the first place. I was fortunate to have the support of my amazing family and friends to help me out of that terrible situation, and persuade me to take one last chance on my testing career. Through hard work and encouragement from the testing community, I managed to claw my way back from that precipice and I now feel like my passion, my drive, and my career are at an all time high. I’m hopeful that my story will encourage others to look after their mental wellbeing, and to seek help when needed in order to be the best version of themselves.

Bio

I’m a 40 year old father of 2, living in London, United Kingdom.

Across my 15 years in the field of quality and testing I’ve been a tester, senior, lead, test manager, head of testing and am now helping eBay UK to transform into a truly Agile business. I have a real passion for testing as a profession and have been told that my passion is infectious when talking about my experiences and perspectives on the subject.

I’m a prolific Twitter and Slack user, plus testing community advocate and I’m in the process of resurrecting my blogging and starting to do occasional Vlogs, having taken a temporary step back over the last few months due to work commitments. I’ve spoken at several 99 second talks to ~300 people on several occasions at TestBash events and I’d love the opportunity to share my experience and knowledge with people.


Facing the Enemy with Scala

Oz Chihwayi & Alka Sooful

Abstract

Having recently been introduced to an environment in which Scala is the main programming language, we were surprised to discover great benefits for testers to learn this functional language. We will explore the basics and share with attendees some real practical tools for better testing.

Talk description

Scala is very interesting in that it fuses Object Oriented Programming and Functional language into a concise, logical and extremely powerful language. In this session, Alka and Oz will take the attendees on a journey of learning the basics of Scala as a programming language and we will uncover its capabilities in a hands on practical session. Since we believe learning is best achieved when people are having fun, we will make use of a popular video game throughout this highly interactive and experiential workshop. In group settings, attendees will be required to collaboratively tackle different stages of the game by applying some newly learned techniques based on the Scala programming language. Debriefs among the groups will allow for sharing of interesting discoveries and deeper learning.

The key learning outcomes from this session are: 1. Introduction to Scala and functional programming concepts 2. Applying our newly learnt programming concepts to improve testing in our different contexts 3. Learning and sharpening our technical skills by exploring games and everyday tech and gadgets

Talk Notes

In this tag team, Alka is a highly experienced test engineer with a development background, and Oz is a tester with an affinity for learning and human working systems. In this session we will share our passion for learning and fun. Attendees ought to bring an insane hunger to learn, play and explore and have access to a machine running Windows/Mac/Linux in a pair or mob setting. We will provide the system under test and any other required tools.

Bios

With over 15 years of working in the delivery, testing and maintenance of systems, Oz seeks to identify and solve the right problems, while realising value. Oz loves to share experiences and is an advocate for collaboration in teams and organisations. He currently works as a Quality Coordinator at Jemstep Test South Africa and is a co-organiser of the Joburg Software Testers meetup. He is active in building a community of super testers. A life learner and explorer; he believes thinking is his strongest skill in his bag of many varied tricks. Oz became an accidental runner who enjoys long runs and has completed the Comrades marathon.

Alka is a young but highly experienced test engineer. Her software development background further helps her to add great value to ensuring customers receive the best quality of software possible. She strongly believes that any problem in life can be solved by some sort of software. She enjoys a high quality of service delivery and wishes to contribute to that service delivery goal by adding value to software quality via automation engineering. Apart from her passion for software and quality, she is a deep thinker with a creative heart.


Pyramids, Quadrants and Stickers Oh My!

Leo Hepis, Vernon Richards & Martin Hynie

Abstract:

Let’s Test SA brings together some of the worlds brightest and most talented testers, thinkers and thought leaders. In so doing, we see many bring with them their own understanding of deep areas of study and practice. Satir, Cynefin, Complexity Theory, NVC, Design Thinking, Ontologies, Sensemaking, Systems Thinking, Lean… AAAARRRGGGHHH!!!

I mean… it’s amazing, but also overwhelming. So many excellent presenters, each providing us a quick glimpse into their worlds of personal learning. Any one of these sessions might lead to years of exploration and experimentation in order to fully appreciate the potential value. Your challenge quickly becomes one of deciding where to pursue further knowledge. This can feel both overwhelming and intimidating. After attending so many great sessions, how do we safely dabble and educate ourselves in a world with so many fascinating concepts? So many are clearly excellent tools to be cultured, but everything starts to feel like a trade-off. Or at the very least, a limitation.

Can we balance deep study across multiple disciplines without giving up most of our free time?

In this session, Vernon, Leo and Martin would like to invite you to a group design workshop. We will be focussing on creating realistic strategies for exploring deeply complex and rich subject matter post conference. Where to start? How to manage? How to leverage the community? Can we build an ecosystem to support one another?

We do however need something from you… BRING.ALL.THE.TOPICS!!! Bring all your areas of greatest excitement from this conference. Bring your concerns, and areas of confusion. Bring your questions. Bring your real life commitments/schedules. Together, let’s draft your post Let’s Test learning plan. Let’s Learn 2019 has begun!

Bios

With almost twenty years of specialization in software testing and development, Martin’s attention has gradually shifted towards embracing uncertainty, and redefining testing as an ongoing transformative research activity. The greatest gains in quality can be found when we emphasize communication, team development, business alignment and organizational learning.
A self-confessed conference junkie, Martin travels the world incorporating ideas introduced by various sources of inspiration (including Cynefin, complexity theory, constraint theory, ontologies, the Satir Model, branding and marketing science, agile principles, and even progressive natural movement training… no, not kidding) to help teams iteratively learn, to embrace failures as opportunities and to simply enjoy working together.


What is Context?

Paul Holland

Abstract

Many testers call themselves Context Driven Testers. But are they really driven by their context or do they simply perform Exploratory Testing or use Session Based Test Management? In this talk Paul will explain what he thinks it means to be “Context Driven”. He will cover what you need to know and understand to be Context Driven. He will share a list of context questions that he feels should be answered to understand your own context. In addition he will review some of the various contexts that he has been exposed to during his career and how he approached testing in those situations.

Bio

Paul is a Senior Director of Test Engineering at Medidata Solutions, Inc. in New York City. Paul has over 20 years experience in software testing. Prior to joining Medidata in August 2016 he was Head of Testing at a small New York based consultancy for 2 years and previously he spent 2 years as the principal consultant and owner at Testing Thoughts, and 17 years at Alcatel-Lucent.
Paul specializes in adapting testing methodologies to reduce waste, and be more effective and efficient. Finding ways to document only that which needs to be documented. Modifying reporting of test activities to provide actionable information to stakeholders and reduce/eliminate potentially harmful metrics. Paul is one of four instructors of the Rapid Software Testing course, developed by James Bach and Michael Bolton.


In-Sprint Automation, Build the Culture

Shekhar Ramphal

Abstract

The challenges I faced in automating in sprint and overcoming them by getting the team involved. Main statement: In sprint automation isn’t a myth, challenge your team to test differently and reduce waste.

Description

In the last 3 years my company and team have pushed an “automate as much as we can” mentality.

This has proven to be challenging other testers and myself, having to not just test but also automate as many test cases as possible. To add to the pressure, we run 2-week sprints with an endless backlog which leaves no time to catch up on automation at a later stage.

So, I approached the problem like most, a lot of late nights and a frustrated team. Automated tests were in now the definition of done and testing was labelled the bottle neck. Sound familiar?

This model was unsustainable and to make things worse the quality of our product wasn’t getting any better, it got worse since us testers were focused on getting our coding skills up to scratch which left no time to put in any effort into the critical thinking.

Things had to change fast, and we were tired of testing being blamed for not making commitments.

I’ll share the challenges faced in trying to be an effective agile team member and automating as much as possible up front.

The journey of changing the culture of my agile team from one were the QA is responsible for quality, to one where the QA drives the quality. The things we have tried in our sprints with regards to create visibility on tasks, how building a testing framework that allows for easy coding and debugging as well as tips on getting Devs involved and treating the code and tests as one.

Bio

Passionate about software testing, Computer engineer by qualification, now a full stack tester.

Testing as a career grew on me, and dabble in all areas from manual QA, to system design and architecting for testability, Performance and security as well as automation in different languages.


 

Let's Test Conferences on Context-Driven Testing - For Testers, By Testers

When we say ”for testers, by testers” we mean that our main goal for these conferences is to make them a valuable experience for all participants, not to maximize profit. We are ourselves part of a team made up of serious, passionate and professional testers that back in 2011 decided that it was time to set up a context-driven testing conference in Europe. Since the inaugural Let’s Test conference in 2012, some team members have left and others have been added, and the conference has expanded to been organized in Australia as well as in Europe. We’re happy to see the Let’s Test family grow, but regardless of where you visit a Let’s Test conference, you can be sure that we’ll never compromise on the “for testers, by testers” principle.